Help Unlocking Phone from Virgin Mobile (Sprint) Network

Go to solution
Highlighted
Accomplice

Help Unlocking Phone from Virgin Mobile (Sprint) Network

 
See more topics labeled with:
18 REPLIES 18
Highlighted
Agent

We value your privacy and security. Due to the nature of your concern, we would like to authenticate your account, but for us to do this in a secure way we need to take this to a private channel where we can discuss private account information. Please send us a private message along with your phone number, the PIN and a brief description of your request. To send a private message, click on any of the social care agents user names and select the option send this user a private message.

Highlighted
Enthusiast

My phone was purchased by me in full from Virgin Mobile you own zero rights to my property payed and billed in good standing through another provider. It is ludicrous and morally wrong. I'm switching carriers asap because your dirty business will not get any more of my money.

Highlighted
Agent

These are the requirements to unlock the device: -The device has not been reported lost or stolen. -The device has been activated at least 12 months before and a payment has been made in the last 90 days of that 12-month activation anniversary. -The device must be within reach of our network in the United States with the Boost Mobile SIM card. You must have the account information where the phone was or is active so we can verify that it meets the requirements.

Highlighted
Enthusiast

I have multiple times they are holding my phone hostage.
Highlighted
Agent

Hello, @KaidensMyWorld! We value your privacy and security. Due to the nature of your concern, we would like to authenticate your account, but for us to do this in a secure way we need to take this to a private channel where we can discuss private account information. Please send us a private message along with your phone number, the PIN and a brief description of your request. To send a private message, click on any of the social care agents user names and select the option send this user a private message.

Highlighted
Enthusiast

I'm having the same issue
Highlighted

I'm so sorry we let you down,  andrewshu. We're always looking to provide the best experience for our customers. Might you be up for sending me a private message? I'd love to know more about your experience and how we can make it better.

Highlighted
Enthusiast

Phones bought from Virgin Mobile were subject to the following unlocking policies:

  • You must be or have been a  Virgin Mobile member.
  • The phone must be locked to Virgin Mobile’s network.
  • The phone cannot be reported as lost or stolen.
  • The phone must be HSPA or LTE compatible.
  • Subsidized phones must have been activated with service for at least 90 days.   Phones that’ve been purchased outright or that don’t have a remaining phone balance or discounts, can be unlocked any time if all other requirements are met.
  • Prepaid phones can be unlocked at anytime if there’s a prepaid balance to deduct the unlocking fee.
  • Your account must be in good standing.
  • If your account has been cancelled, you can’t have a balance owing on your account and any pending charges should be paid.

Source: https://www.virginmobile.ca/en/support/faq.html%3Fq=048?ui-theme=m&province=ON&geoResult=fai...

 

Note that nowhere does it state they can hold it locked for 365 days. Any phone purchased from Virgin Mobile and paid in full cannot be held to Boost Mobile's unlocking policies simply because they bought out Virgin Mobile. Full refunds must be issued for all such customers. This is an unacceptable business practice.

Highlighted
Enthusiast

I experienced a similar encounter on 8/30/20, where Boost refused to unlock an iPhone that I have owned outright for nearly a year, a phone purchased from Virgin Mobile before taken over by Boost. I was a Boost Mobile customer at the time and wanted to take my iPhone to another carrier, especially since I never signed up with Boost or bought a phone from them. After over three hours getting denied, bounced around on hold from one department to another (including them transferring me to Apple to have Apple tell me that Boost knew Apple couldn't unlock the phone and that they were just trying to get rid of me), and finally speaking to a supervisor, they insisted that they could not legally unlock my phone, citing CTIA (The Consumer Code for Wireless Service: https://www.ctia.org/the-wireless-industry/industry-commitments/consumer-code-for-wireless-service)....Of course, this code is written to protect consumer rights, but Boost customer service tried to use this to say that the law wouldn't let them unlock it. They were citing the Prepaid Unlocking Policy: "Carriers upon request will unlock prepaid mobile wireless devices no later than one year after initial activation, consistent with reasonable time, payment or usage requirements." The customer service supervisor with whom I spoke insisted that "no later than one year after initial activation" meant they couldn't unlock it before then and the law wouldn't let them. I insisted that they the CTIA (which is not a law) says no such thing and that Boost is enforcing a policy of its own creation on a phone they have no legal claim to, since it was paid-in-full and purchased from Virgin Mobile on a Virgin Mobile plan.

 

I tried to use the following analogy to explain how ludicrous it was for them to make a legal claim on my phone: "Imagine I bought a car from Toyota and paid it in full. Later that year Honda buys out Toyota and tells me I can't have the title to my car that I already own because Toyota's policy says customers don't get the title until 20 years after purchase (or some other completely arbitrary length of time). I did not buy a Honda or buy it from Honda, and I do not owe any financing or other obligations to anyone, and yet Honda claims I now no longer have the right to the title to my car and that Honda will keep my title for 20 years. In what world could this possibly be legal?"

(Disclaimer: Toyota and Honda are used in this analogy for ease of use in brand recognition, and this scenario does not reflect any real policies of either of these companies).

 

The customer service supervisor said this was a false analogy because they are different industries. How can telecommunications companies make such a claim? There was no condition for continued service from Virgin Mobile when I bought my phone and yet Boost claims that by me continuing as a Boost customer after they acquired Virgin Mobile, I was subject to all of Boost's policies (terms never agreed to). My phone was never financed. It was paid for in cash up front with no obligation for continued service. But when Boost Mobile acquired Virgin Mobile, they decided they now owned my phone and I couldn't unlock it for a year.

 

I had to buy a new iPhone from the new carrier to get away from Boost (even though I never had a contract with them). Now I have a useless brick that I had paid for but apparently don't have the right to use. I don't see how this is anything less than theft. I will be pursuing legal recourse. At this point simply agreeing to unlock my phone is not sufficient, since I have already had to purchase a new one. The minimum acceptable response is a full refund for the price of the iPhone I paid to Virgin Mobile (who apparently sold the phone I already owned to Boost, in essence). Others who are in similar situations having phones they own denied their right to unlock their phone should reply to this post. I will be forwarding this complaint and others posted to it to the Attorney General's office. 

 

Highlighted

Hi, Rafnco! We are terribly sorry to hear about your situation. As per company rule, we have requirements to be able to unlock a device, though this device needs to be a Boost Mobile device first, yours is not. If your device was active and migrated to Boost Mobile the time on Virgin Mobile would of count towards the length of time needed to request the device's unlock.